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Indefinite Pitch

A nice intellectual exercise, which also opens up our imagination, going from geography to the mythology of cinema and back, with the explicit intention of binding them.

Indefinite Pitch is a brilliant meditation on what a film project can mean, on how indefinite the distinction is between a project and product. Indefinite Pitch seems to be a pitch itself, then a short film on pitching, but finally a film that doesn’t want to be a film or a pitch. We see only video stills of a river, the Androscoggin, in New Hampshire. The voice-over tells us about the territory of this river, connecting Wikipedia information and personal memories. Indefinite Pitch is an anthropological study of the American province and it is a geo-historical spoken cartography of a specific town: Berlin. Actually, Berlin in New Hampshire. Thus, Indefinite Pitch is equally the story of misunderstandings, of imagination, of folk stories, of fake identities: of nothing but cinema. The Masked Menace, a 1927 drama film serial shot in Berlin, New Hampshire, plays a pivotal role in connecting James N. Kienitz Wilkins’ current filming and the legends engraved in and around Berlin. Indefinite Pitch is a film about water and fire, about the paper production that constituted the economy of this place, about its recent prison and its crimes. It is also a formal inquiry on un-synchronisation, on sound deformation, on movement in video stills: on nothing but cinema. A nice intellectual exercise, which also opens up our imagination, going from geography to the mythology of cinema and back, with the explicit intention of binding them.

Text: Giuseppe Di Salvatore

First published: August 11, 2016

Indefinite Pitch | Short Film | James N. Kienitz Wilkins | USA 2016 | 23’ | Festival del film Locarno | Fuori concorso: Shorts

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